Now Open! Liberty: Don Troiani’s Paintings of the Revolutionary War at Museum of the American Revolution

October 20th, 2021 Uncategorized

Without the benefit of photography, the Revolutionary War can be difficult to envision. But what did the war actually look like? Our new special exhibit immerses you in the dramatic and research-based works of this nationally renowned historical artist, bringing the compelling stories about the diverse people and complex events of the American Revolution to life. This special exhibit is included in the price of general Museum admission.

“It is my hope that my paintings help people today grasp the significance of the Revolutionary struggles of the people who lived 250 years ago, whose brave actions continue to shape our lives.”

— Don Troiani, Artist

SOUTHBURY, CT, 27 JUNE 2011-062711JS03– Civil War expert and Revolutionary War artist Don Troiani sits in front of his unfinished painting of the Battle of Fort Washington depicting the wounding of Margaret Corbin in 1776, inside his Southbury home studio.
Jim Shannon/Republican-American

About the Artist

Connecticut-based artist Don Troiani has dedicated much of his artistic career to imagining and recreating what the Revolutionary War truly looked like. His use of primary sources, archaeology, and original artifacts imbues his paintings with an almost photographic-quality realism. Using a masterful combination of “artistry and accuracy” (New York Times), Troiani’s paintings demonstrate his extraordinary combination of historical research, technical skill, and artistic drama.

46 Original Paintings

Including the newest: “Brave Men as Ever Fought”

Among the collection of paintings on display is “Brave Men as Ever Fought,” portraying the young African American sailor James Forten watching as Black and Native American troops in the ranks of the Continental Army march past Independence Hall. The painting was commissioned in 2019 by the Museum with funding provided by the Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail of the National Park Service.

Get the Most Out of Your Visit

Tour Options Available Now and Coming Soon

During your visit, dive deeper into the stories behind the paintings with our audio tour, available to download for free to your phone (don’t forget your headphones!), or for rent on pre-loaded devices at the front desk. We also have 30-minute guided tours available for booking through Group Sales. We’ll also be launching additional resources for educators to use in their classrooms. Stay tuned!

Start Free Audio Tour | Plan Your Group Visit

Accessibility: Tactile Paintings in Liberty & More

This exhibit includes raised tactile images of three of Don Troiani’s paintings for use by guests with visual impairments, created and donated by Clovernook Center for the Blind & Visually Impaired. Our entire building—including Liberty—is wheelchair accessible. Our Reception Desk has a range of resources to help make visits accessible and comfortable for all guests, including manual wheelchairs and noise reducing headphones.

More About Accessibility Resources

Shop Liberty Keepsakes: Great for Gifting!

Enjoy the exhibit? Take the experience home with you! The exhibition catalog features paintings from the exhibit and the objects they’re paired with. Individual prints and notecards showcasing some of the most popular works from the exhibit are also available. And don’t miss the collection of painted pewter figures inspired by the exhibit. Members get 10% off at checkout!

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Health & Safety at the Museum

In accordance with Philadelphia city guidelines, all Museum guests ages 5 and up are required to wear a mask inside the building, regardless of vaccination status. For more information, please visit our website. Thank you for helping us protect the safety and health of our guests and staff.

“Troiani’s paintings capture the raw emotions of the women and men caught up in war, allowing us an authentic and dramatic glimpse into the past and helping us grasp the human struggle of the American Revolution.”
— Matthew Skic, Curator of Exhibitions