Timeline of the Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

January

1781, January 25
An emergency shipment of 1.5 million livres arrives in Boston.
1781, January 25

February

1781, February 28
Jean-François de Galaup, comte de Lapérouse arrives in Boston on the frigate l’Astree with emergency funds for Rochambeau's army. Lapérouse had sailed from Brest on 23 December 1780.
1781, February 28

March

1781, March 2
Washington departs from New Windsor with Major General Robert Howe and his aides Tench Tilghman and David Humphries to meet with Rochambeau in Newport.
1781, March 2
1781, March 3
Washington spends the night at the home of Col. Andrew Morehouse of Duchess County on the Fishkill-Hopewell road, near the Connecticut State line.
1781, March 3
1781, March 4
Washington and his entourage arrive in Hartford were they meet up with Governor Jonathan Trumbull and his son Jonathan Jr. Washington and the younger Trumbull continue on to Lebanon where they spend the night.
1781, March 4
1781, March 5
Washington reviews Lauzun’s Legion and continues on to spend the night in Kingston, RI.
1781, March 5
1781, March 6
Washington and his military family take the Narragansett Ferry to Jamestown and arrive in Newport around 02:00 p.m. Here they board a barge sent by Admiral Charles René Dominique Gochet, chevalier Destouches that takes them to Destouches’ flagship the duc de Bourgogne.
1781, March 6
1781, March 6-12
Washington visits with Rochambeau in Newport.
1781, March 6-12
1781, March 8
Departure of a French fleet under Admiral Charles René Dominique Sochet, chevalier Destouches, Destouches with 1,500 troops under the baron de Vioménil for the Chesapeake. Their aim is to capture Benedict Arnold.
1781, March 8
1781, March 13
Travelling from Newport via Bristol Ferry and Warren, Washington reaches Providence where he spent the nights of 13/14 and 14/15 March.
1781, March 13
1781, March 15
Washington and his military family leave Providence and ride to Lebanon in Connecticut via Canterbury, Scotland and Windham, traveling more than 60 miles on horseback that day.
1781, March 15
1781, March 16
Washington spends the night in Hartford.
1781, March 16
1781, March 17
Washington spends the night in Hartford.
1781, March 17
1781, March 18-21
The itinerary for these days is unknown.
1781, March 18-21
1781, March 22
Washington and his military family are back in New Windsor.
1781, March 22
1781, March 27
Destouches returns from Virginia after having engaged a Royal Navy fleet under Admiral Mariot Arbuthnot off the Chesapeake Bay.
1781, March 27
1782, March 28
The frigate Emeraude arrives in Newport with 4.8 million livres. She had left Brest on 14 February.

The funds are escorted overland by Major DePrez of the Royal Deux-Ponts to Philadelphia, where they arrive in the second week of May. With the departure of DePrez all French forces have left Rhode Island.
1782, March 28

April

1780, April 27
The marquis de Lafayette arrives in Boston on the Hermione.
1780, April 27

May

1781, May 2
The French frigate l’Engageante arrives in Boston with cash for Rochambeau’s army.
1781, May 2
1781, May 6
The vicomte de Rochambeau returns to Boston on the Concorde with funds for Rochambeau and the news that there will be no re-enforcements other than the troops already on their way. The Concorde, which had left France on 26 March 1781, also brings Jacques Melchior Saint-Laurent, comte de Barras, to replace Admiral de Ternay as commanding officer of the fleet.
1781, May 6
1781, May 18
Washington leaves New Windsor and spends the night at “Morgans Tavern 43 miles from Fishkill Landing”.
1781, May 18
1781, May 19
Washington arrives in Wethersfield accompanied by Generals Henry Knox and Louis Lebègue Duportail and lodges in the home of Joseph Webb.

Rochambeau and Chastellux set out from Newport for Wethersfield in Connecticut. They spend the night most likely with Lieutenant Governor Jabez Bowen in Providence.
1781, May 19
1781, May 20
Rochambeau and Chastellux spend the night at Daniel “White’s Tavern at the Sign of the Black Horse” in Andover, Connecticut.
1781, May 20
1781, May 21
Rochambeau and Chastellux arrive in Wethersfield and lodge at Stillmann's Tavern.
1781, May 21
1781, May 22
Washington and Rochambeau meet at Wethersfield to discuss strategy. They decide to focus on New York City.
1781, May 22
1781, May 23
Rochambeau and Chastellux spend the night in Wethersfield.
1781, May 23
1781, May 24
Rochambeau and Chastellux spend the night at Daniel “White’s Tavern at the Sign of the Black Horse” in Andover.
1781, May 24
1781, May 25
Rochambeau and Chastellux spend the night in Providence.
1781, May 25
1781, May 26
Rochambeau and Chastellux return to Newport.
1781, May 26

June

1781, June 5
The town council of Newport votes “to draw up an address of thanks, to His Excell[enc]y General Rochambeau, for his particular Attention for the Welfare of this Town during his command here.”

The infantry and artillery of Lauzun's Legion receive orders to embark at 6:00 a.m. the next day to cross over to Providence.
1781, June 5
1781, June 6
Lauzun’s men spend the night in the barracks at Poppasquash.
1781, June 6
1781, June 7
A convoy of eight vessels accompanied by the 50-gun ship Le Sagittaire carrying 592 infantry replacements incl. 134 sick soldiers and two companies, 68 men, of artillery, arrives in Boston from France.

The replacements had been drawn from the Regiments of Auvergne (71 healthy and 7 sick soldiers) and Neustrie (19 plus 28) for the Bourbonnois; Languedoc (80 plus 6) for the Soissonnois; Boulonnois (112 plus 36) for Saintonge; Anhalt (46 plus 4) and La Marck (39 plus 36) for the Royal Deux- Ponts; and Barrois (31 plus 17) for Lauzun's Legion.

Upon arrival in Providence on 13 June the 407 infantry fit for duty join their units, the 134 sick will either stay in hospitals in Boston and/or continue on to Newport once they are able. 35 men of the regiment Languedoc for the Bourbonnois and 25 for the Saintonge are identified as "non arrive" but joined their units within a few days.

A detailed break-down of numbers for the artillery has not been located. These numbers add up to 668 men, not the 660 reported as having arrived in the Rochambeau papers.

Lauzun’s Infantry and artillery reach Providence from Newport.
1781, June 7
1781, June 7
The frigate Le Sagittaire arrives in Boston with a letter from Admiral de Grasse to Rochambeau written on the high seas on 29 March 1781. In it de Grasse informs Rochambeau that he would be in Ste. Domingue (Haiti) by the end of June and that he could be in American waters by 15 July.
1781, June 7
1781, June 10
Around 5:00 a.m. in the morning of 10 June 1781, the First Brigade of French forces begins to embark on vessels waiting for them in the harbor of Newport to take them to Providence.

Rochambeau leaves behind in Newport an infantry detachment of half a dozen officers, 100 NCOs and enlisted men from each of the four infantry regiments and 30 men artillery under the command of Brigadier Gabriel de Choisy.

He also leaves behind his siege artillery consisting of twelve 24-lb guns, eight 16-lb guns, four 8-inch and seven 12- inch mortars and two 8-inch howitzers.
1781, June 10
1781, June 11
The First Brigade of French forces arrives in Providence around 9:00 p.m., too late to set up camp.

Those who reach Providence spend the night in the Market House, others in the Old Work House on the west bank of the Moshassuk River just north of Smith Street.

The Second Brigade embarks.

The replacements leave Boston and march to camp in Dedham.

The exact march route is unknown; the stops in Dedham and Wrentham are based on the route of Rochambeau’s infantry to Boston in December 1782.
1781, June 11
1781, June 12
The Second Brigade of French forces disembarks in Providence and joins the First Brigade in camp on either side of Cranston Street between Westminster Avenue and Broad Street.

The replacements leave Dedham march to Wrentham.

The exact march route is unknown.
1781, June 12
1781, June 13
Lieutenant-Colonel Hugau of Lauzun’s Legion receives orders to march from Providence to Lebanon on Saturday, 16 June, with the 31 healthy replacements for the Legion from the Royal Barrois due to arrive that day from Boston.
1781, June 13
1781, June 13
The replacements arrive in Providence and encamp. Those unfit to accompany their new regiments to White Plains continue to Newport.

The exact march route is unknown; the stops in Dedham and Wrentham are based on the route of Rochambeau’s infantry to Boston in December 1782.
1781, June 13
1781, June 14
The infantry and artillery of Lauzun’s Legion leave Providence and spend the nights of 14/15 June in Plainfield, and of 16/17 June in Windham. They arrive in Lebanon on 17 June.
1781, June 14
1781, June 16
Lt.-Col. Hugau of Lauzun’s Legion departs from Providence with the replacements for Lauzun’s Legion for Lebanon where they arrive on 19 June.
1781, June 16
1781, June 18
For the march to New York Rochambeau organized his forces into four divisions of one infantry regiment each plus its artillery complement and wagon train. Lauzun’s Legion took a route separate from the infantry that took it along the coast.

The Regiment Bourbonnois as the first French division leaves its camp in Providence for its next camp at Waterman’s Tavern. The remaining three Regiments Royal Deux-Ponts, Soissonnnois and Saintonge follow over the next three days.
1781, June 18
1781, June 19
The Regiment Bourbonnois leaves its camp at Waterman’s Tavern on its way to its camp in Plainfield, CT. The remaining three regiments, Royal Deux-Ponts, Soissonnnois and Saintonge follow over the next three days.
1781, June 19
1781, June 20
The frigate Concorde leaves Newport for the Caribbean with a report about the Wethersfield Conference and a request that de Grasse borrow 1.2 million livres in Martinique or St. Domingue. Eventually de Grasse will borrow the funds in Cuba.

De Grasse receives Rochambeau’s letter of 28 May (with postscripts) on 16 July; his response informing Rochambeau that he would sail to the Chesapeake, leaves St. Domingue on the Concorde on 28 July, reaches Newport on 11 August, and White Plains on 14 August 1781.
1781, June 20

July

1780, mid-July
The Ile de France carrying 350 men of the Bourbonnois is separated from de Ternay’s convoy and puts into Boston.
1780, mid-July
1781, July 10
A small French fleet under Captain de La Villebrune sails out of Newport for Long Island.
1781, July 10
1781, July 12
The Romulus and three French frigates from Newport enter the Sound between Long Island and the mainland in an attempt to capture Fort Lloyd (or Fort Franklin near Huntington, Long Island). The enterprise fails.
1781, July 12
1780, July 11
Around 10:30 a.m. a fleet commanded by Admiral Charles- Henri-Louis d’Arsac de Ternay carrying some 450 officers and 5,300 men under the comte de Rochambeau, sails into Narragansett Bay and anchors between Conanicut, Rose and Goat Islands.
1780, July 11
1780, July 12
“The town (Newport) was beautifully illuminated this evening.”
1780, July 12
1781, July 14
The small French fleet under Captain de La Villebrune returns from Rhode Island to Newport.
1781, July 14
1780, July 18
News of safe arrival in Boston of the Ile de France with 350 men of the Bourbonnois Regiment reaches Newport. The would indicate an arrival date of 14/15 July 1780.
1780, July 18
1780, July 20 (?)
The Bourbonnois soldiers set out for Providence and Newport. Presumably they spend the night in Dedham (?). The departure date is probably 20 July since it is a three-day march to Providence where the unit arrives on 22 July.

The exact march route is unknown; the stops in Dedham and Wrentham are based on the route of Rochambeau’s infantry to Boston in December 1782.
1780, July 20 (?)
1780, July 21 (?)
The Bourbonnois soldiers spend the night in Wrentham (?).
1780, July 21 (?)
1780, July 22 (?)
The Providence Gazette reports that “a Transport with 350 troops on board and a large quantity of Military Stores which had been separated from the fleet is safe arrived in Boston. The Troops are on their march for this Town on their way to Newport and are expected to arrive here To-day.”
1780, July 22 (?)
1780, July 22 (?)
Navy Lieutenant de Valernais of the frigate Hermione is buried in the cemetery at Trinity Church in Newport, RI.
1780, July 22 (?)
1780, July 22 (?)
The Bourbonnois soldiers arrive in Providence.
1780, July 22 (?)
1780, July 23 (?)
The Bourbonnois detachment marches from Providence to Newport and rejoins the regiment on 24 July.
1780, July 23 (?)

August

1781, August 11
The Concorde arrives in Newport with a letter for Rochambeau from Admiral de Grasse in Haiti dated 28 July 1781 stating that he would sail for the Chesapeake on 13 August but that he would only stay until 15 October.

The letter reaches Rochambeau in the Odell House in Westchester County, NY on 14 August 1781.

De Grasse in fact departed eight days earlier on 5 August with 28 ships of the line, supporting frigates and around 3,300 officers and men from the Gâtinois, Agenois, Tourraine and the Metz artillery.
1781, August 11
1782, August 11
French 80-gun battleship le Magnifique (1749) is wrecked in Boston Harbor. On 3 September 1782 Congress decided to present the 74-gun-ship America laid down in May 1777 in Portsmouth, NH to France to replace the Magnifique. She left Portsmouth on 24 June 1783 and sailed into Brest on 16 July 1783. In the fall of 1786 she was found to be severely damaged by dry-rot, probably caused by construction with green timber, and scrapped.
1782, August 11
1781, August 15
The French frigate Magicienne arrives in Boston with 1.8 million livres for Rochambeau. The news reaches Rochambeau on 24 August at his headquarters in King's Ferry. He orders Major Louis Aimable de Prez de Crassier of the Royal Deux- Ponts, who is stationed with 104 officers and men in Providence to guard French stores, to furnish a detachment of one lieutenant and 24 men to commissaire de guerre Jean Baptiste Louis Jujardy de Granville to go to Boston to retrieve these funds. Granville and the detachment under his command were to escort the funds from Boston via Springfield to New Windsor. From New Windsor they were to take the route to Chester, Warwick, Sussex Court House, Hackettstown and Coryell's Ferry to Philadelphia.
1781, August 15
1781, August 23
Admiral Barras slips out of Newport with nine ships, incl. seven ships of the line carrying 480 men infantry and 130 men artillery as well as the siege artillery. They arrive in the James River in Virginia on 10 September.

The remaining garrison of Newport, 104 men under Major Louis Aimable de Prez de Crassier of the Royal Deux-Ponts, march to Providence, where they arrive on 23 August.
1781, August 23
1781, August 25
John Laurens sails into Boston on the frigate Resolue with funds and supplies for Washington. Laurens arrives in Philadelphia on 2 September and re-joins Washington’s staff.

The total valued of these supplies was almost 2.3 million livres in kind and the equivalent of about 500.00 Spanish milled dollars in silver. Morris used about half it, some 254.000 dollars, to establish the Bank of North America.

It took fourteen wagons hauled by fifty-six oxen and lead horses to convey the specie to Philadelphia where it arrived nine weeks later on 6 November 1781.
1781, August 25
1780, August 29
A delegation of Oneida Indians from upstate New York visits General Rochambeau at Newport.
1780, August 29

September

1780, September 18
Rochambeau and Admiral de Ternay set out from Newport at around 9:00 a.m. to meet Washington in Hartford, CT. They spend the night with Lt.-Gov. Jabez Bowen in Providence.
1780, September 18
1780, September 19
A broken wheel forces Rochambeau and de Ternay to spend the night in an unknown Tavern in Scotland.
1780, September 19
1780, September 20
Rochambeau and Ternay take lodgings in the home of Jeremiah Wadsworth in Hartford.
1780, September 20
1780, September 21
Hartford Conference between Rochambeau and Washington.
1780, September 21
1780, September 22
Another broken wheel at the same spot as on 19 September forces Rochambeau and de Ternay to again spend the night in an unknown Tavern in Scotland.
1780, September 22
1780, September 23
Rochambeau and Admiral de Ternay spend the night with Lt.- Gov. Jabez Bowen in Providence.
1780, September 23
1780, September 25
Rochambeau and Admiral de Ternay return to Newport at around 7:00 p.m.
1780, September 25

October

1780, October 19
State of Connecticut offers winter quarters to Lauzun’s hussars after Providence refused to provide quarters
1780, October 19
1781, October 26
News of the surrender of Cornwallis reaches Newport
1781, October 26
1780, October 28
French frigate Amazone under Jean-François de Galaup, comte de Lapérouse leaves Newport for Brest with Rochambeau’s son, the vicomte de Rochambeau. The Amazone is accompanied by the Hermione and the Surveillante. He arrives in L’Orient on 15 November 1780 and is back in Paris on 23 November 1780.
1780, October 28

November

1780, November 1
French infantry enters winter quarters in Newport.
1780, November 1
1780, November 9
Hussars of Lauzun’s Legion ride from Newport to Providence.
1780, November 9
1782, November 9
In preparation for the march to the northward Rochambeau had divided his forces into five divisions of one regiment each which are to march one day apart. Lauzun’s Legion forms the first division, the Bourbonnois Regiment the second, Royal Deux-Ponts the third, Soissonnois the fourth and Saintonge the fifth division.

That structure was maintained until the arrival of the Second Division, i.e., the Bourbonnois Regiment, in Trenton on 3 September 1782, when Rochambeau re-organized his units into two-regiment brigades for the march to Massachusetts.

Lauzun’s Legion does not join the infantry regiments on the march to Boston. It marches instead from New York to winter quarters in Wilmington, Delaware.

Coming from Dorrance Tavern in Connecticut the French First Brigade consisting of the Regiments Bourbonnois and the Royal Deux- Ponts camp near Waterman’s Tavern in Rhode Island.
1782, November 9
1782, November 10
Coming from Waterman’s Tavern the French First Brigade consisting of the Regiments Bourbonnois and the Royal Deux- Ponts camp in Providence.

The Second Brigade consisting of the Regiments Soissonnnois and Saintonge arrives in Providence.
1782, November 10
1780, November 12
Lauzun’s hussars leave Providence for Windham, Connecticut.
1780, November 12
1782, November 13
The French camp is moved to the property of Jeremiah Dexter. French forces will remain here until 4 December.
1782, November 13
1782, November 16
The campaign artillery leaves Providence for Attleborough (?) Wrentham (?). The route is unknown as are the three locations of the three encampments.
1782, November 16
1782, November 17
French artillery leaves Attleborough (?)/Wrentham (?) for Dedham (?).
1782, November 17
1782, November 18
French artillery leaves Wrentham (?) Dedham (?) for ?
1782, November 18
1782, November 19
French artillery arrives in Boston and is quartered in vacant houses in the harbor. The exact march route is unknown; the comte de Clermont-Crèvecoeur notes that he left Providence with the artillery on 16 November and arrived in Boston on 19 November.
1782, November 19

December

1782, December 1
Rochambeau, accompanied, among others, by his son, by the comte de Vauban and the comte de Lauberdière, says farewell to his troops in Providence and in a heavy snowfall sets out for Newburgh, NY. They spend the night at Dorrance’ Tavern in CT.
1782, December 1
1782, December 4
For the march from Providence to Boston Rochambeau had reorganized his forces into two brigades with the Bourbonnois and Royal Deux-Ponts Regiments forming the First Brigade and the Soissonnois and Saintonge Regiments the Second Brigade.

Lauzun’s Legion does not join the infantry regiments on the march to Boston. It has already marched from New York to winter quarters in Wilmington, Delaware.

The First Brigade of French forces consisting of the Regiments Bourbonnois and Royal Deux-Ponts leaves its encampment in Providence and marches to its next camp in Wrentham.
1782, December 4
1782, December 5
The First Brigade of French forces consisting of the Regiments Bourbonnois and Royal Deux-Ponts leaves its encampment in Readham and marches to its next camp in Dedham.

The Second Brigade of French forces consisting of the Regiments Soissonnois and Saintonge leaves its encampment in Providence and marches 19 miles to its camp in Wrentham.
1782, December 5
1782, December 6
The First Brigade of French forces consisting of the Regiments Bourbonnois and Royal Deux-Ponts leaves its encampment in Dedham and marches 13 miles to Boston and embarks.

The Second Brigade of French forces consisting of the Regiments Soissonnois and Saintonge leaves its encampment in Readham and marches to its next camp in Dedham.
1782, December 6
1782, December 7
The Second Brigade of French forces consisting of the Regiments Soissonnois and Saintonge leaves its encampment Dedham and marches 13 miles to Boston and embarks.
1782, December 7
1780, December 13
Rochambeau arrives in Boston. The date of his departure from Newport and the stops along the way are unknown.
1780, December 13
1780, December 15
Learning of the death of Admiral de Ternay earlier in the day, Rochambeau returns to Newport. Route and arrival date are unknown. Ternay’s funeral was on 16 December 1780.
1780, December 15
1782, mid-December
The troops debark again and are lodged “in the city in an old magazine where we almost perished from the cold.”
1782, mid-December
1782, December 19
The troops begin to re-embark.
1782, December 19
1782, December 22
The ships are cut lose from the ice.
1782, December 22
1782, December 23
In the afternoon the ships begin to raise anchor and sail out of Boston Harbor.
1782, December 23
1782, December 24
“In the morning of the 24th, Christmas Day, we raised anchor to sail to the West Indies. Around 10 o’clock we left the town of Boston."
1782, December 24